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Amy Davidson Sorkin

Amy Davidson Sorkin joined The New Yorker in 1995 and has been a staff writer since 2014. As a senior editor for many years, she focussed on national security, international reporting, and features. She helped to reconceive Newyorker.com and served as the site’s executive editor. She is a regular Comment contributor for the magazine.

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What Did We Learn About the Georgia Grand Jury’s Findings?

It’s possible that all of the jurors’ votes recommended against indictment, but it isn’t sounding like it.

The New G.O.P. Takes the Country Hostage with the Debt Ceiling

Why the Republicans’ routine threat to wreck the economy, rather than raise the borrowing limit, could end differently this time.

The Biden-Documents Mess

House Republicans are ramping up conspiracy theories, but one thing seems clear: the government’s documents system has an overclassification addiction.

Is Prince Harry’s “Spare” a Political Manifesto?

His own feelings about the value of the monarchy, he writes, are “complicated.”

What Donald Trump’s Trial Might Look Like

Presidents have been impeached, but none has ever been asked, after leaving office, to turn himself in for arraignment. The January 6th committee’s final actions could help change that.

The Extremely Muddled G.O.P. Logic Behind Moore v. Harper

In the oral arguments, anyway, it looked like the Four Seasons Total Landscaping of legal cases.

After the January 6th Committee

It will cease to exist, as a result of the Republicans’ regaining control of the House. Can the committee’s work move forward without the committee itself?

The Toughness of Nancy Pelosi

She helped save Obamacare and other transformative legislation, and made it clear when the nonsense had to stop.

The G.O.P. Is Standing by Trumpists Ahead of the Senate Midterms

One shouldn’t expect an overflowing of dignity in any of the half-dozen states where Senate seats are being seriously contested.

The Supreme Court Considers What May Be the Final Blow to the Voting Rights Act

Justices Elena Kagan, Ketanji Brown Jackson, and Sonia Sotomayor warn of what’s really at stake in Merrill v. Milligan.

Has the C.I.A. Done More Harm Than Good?

In the agency’s seventy-five years of existence, a lack of accountability has sustained dysfunction, ineptitude, and lawlessness.

The Supreme Court’s Big New Term

There is a feeling with this Court that the conservative Justices could make a landmark ruling out of almost any case.

A Bad Democratic Bet in the G.O.P. Primaries

Will Democrats come to regret the tactic of boosting extreme, election-denying Republican candidates? 

What Will Come of the January 6th Committee’s Case Against Trump?

At its final hearing of the summer, the committee continued to establish the ex-President’s personal culpability in a number of events related to January 6th. The bigger issue may be how to hold him accountable.

What Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson Can Do on a Radical-Right Court

Can the liberal Justices hold the conservatives back—by appealing to shame or the Constitution—as the consequences of the majority’s recklessness become even more dangerous for American democracy?

The Supreme Court’s Reckless Ruling on Guns

The decision will expose any number of well-established laws to similar challenges, and rattle efforts to arrive at a national consensus on guns.

Will the G.O.P. Finally Make a Deal on Guns?

A bipartisan proposal offers Republicans the novel experience of running on a record of having acted to ease the gun crisis—if they can overcome their moral timidity.

The G.O.P. Heckles the January 6th Show

Last week’s televised hearing showed that there is a great deal that remains unknown to the public—and that Republicans could fill in many of the blank spaces in the record.

Eighteen-Year-Olds with AR-15s

The legal fight over age limits on gun purchases is intensifying.

A Consequential Gun Ruling After the Buffalo Massacre

The racist killings showed the horror of firearms; the Supreme Court may be about to make the problem worse.

What Did We Learn About the Georgia Grand Jury’s Findings?

It’s possible that all of the jurors’ votes recommended against indictment, but it isn’t sounding like it.

The New G.O.P. Takes the Country Hostage with the Debt Ceiling

Why the Republicans’ routine threat to wreck the economy, rather than raise the borrowing limit, could end differently this time.

The Biden-Documents Mess

House Republicans are ramping up conspiracy theories, but one thing seems clear: the government’s documents system has an overclassification addiction.

Is Prince Harry’s “Spare” a Political Manifesto?

His own feelings about the value of the monarchy, he writes, are “complicated.”

What Donald Trump’s Trial Might Look Like

Presidents have been impeached, but none has ever been asked, after leaving office, to turn himself in for arraignment. The January 6th committee’s final actions could help change that.

The Extremely Muddled G.O.P. Logic Behind Moore v. Harper

In the oral arguments, anyway, it looked like the Four Seasons Total Landscaping of legal cases.

After the January 6th Committee

It will cease to exist, as a result of the Republicans’ regaining control of the House. Can the committee’s work move forward without the committee itself?

The Toughness of Nancy Pelosi

She helped save Obamacare and other transformative legislation, and made it clear when the nonsense had to stop.

The G.O.P. Is Standing by Trumpists Ahead of the Senate Midterms

One shouldn’t expect an overflowing of dignity in any of the half-dozen states where Senate seats are being seriously contested.

The Supreme Court Considers What May Be the Final Blow to the Voting Rights Act

Justices Elena Kagan, Ketanji Brown Jackson, and Sonia Sotomayor warn of what’s really at stake in Merrill v. Milligan.

Has the C.I.A. Done More Harm Than Good?

In the agency’s seventy-five years of existence, a lack of accountability has sustained dysfunction, ineptitude, and lawlessness.

The Supreme Court’s Big New Term

There is a feeling with this Court that the conservative Justices could make a landmark ruling out of almost any case.

A Bad Democratic Bet in the G.O.P. Primaries

Will Democrats come to regret the tactic of boosting extreme, election-denying Republican candidates? 

What Will Come of the January 6th Committee’s Case Against Trump?

At its final hearing of the summer, the committee continued to establish the ex-President’s personal culpability in a number of events related to January 6th. The bigger issue may be how to hold him accountable.

What Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson Can Do on a Radical-Right Court

Can the liberal Justices hold the conservatives back—by appealing to shame or the Constitution—as the consequences of the majority’s recklessness become even more dangerous for American democracy?

The Supreme Court’s Reckless Ruling on Guns

The decision will expose any number of well-established laws to similar challenges, and rattle efforts to arrive at a national consensus on guns.

Will the G.O.P. Finally Make a Deal on Guns?

A bipartisan proposal offers Republicans the novel experience of running on a record of having acted to ease the gun crisis—if they can overcome their moral timidity.

The G.O.P. Heckles the January 6th Show

Last week’s televised hearing showed that there is a great deal that remains unknown to the public—and that Republicans could fill in many of the blank spaces in the record.

Eighteen-Year-Olds with AR-15s

The legal fight over age limits on gun purchases is intensifying.

A Consequential Gun Ruling After the Buffalo Massacre

The racist killings showed the horror of firearms; the Supreme Court may be about to make the problem worse.